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Marjorie Knoller, Convicted in Dog Mauling, To Be Released


— December 31, 2003

The California woman whose dogs mauled to death a neighbor in January, 2001 will soon be released on parole after serving a little more than a year in prison.

Marjorie Knoller, who was present when her two large Presa Canario dogs attacked and killed Diane Whipple in the hallway of their apartment building, was convicted of second-degree murder in 2002.

On appeal, a judge reduced the verdict to involuntary manslaughter and sentenced Knoller to a prison term of four years, the maximum allowed. Under California’s sentencing laws, Knoller’s parole was mandatory after she had served 14 months.

Knoller will be released sometime within the next few days, according to California Department of Corrections spokesman Russ Heimerich. She will be driven by a parole officer from the Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla to an undisclosed location in southern California to serve her parole.

Knoller will not be allowed to live with her husband, Robert Noel, who was also convicted in the case and was released earlier. That’s because “parolees are usually prohibited from associating with other convicted felons,” CNN reports here.


The California woman whose dogs mauled to death a neighbor in January, 2001 will soon be released on parole after serving a little more than a year in prison.

Marjorie Knoller, who was present when her two large Presa Canario dogs attacked and killed Diane Whipple in the hallway of their apartment building, was convicted of second-degree murder in 2002.

On appeal, a judge reduced the verdict to involuntary manslaughter and sentenced Knoller to a prison term of four years, the maximum allowed. Under California’s sentencing laws, Knoller’s parole was mandatory after she had served 14 months.

Knoller will be released sometime within the next few days, according to California Department of Corrections spokesman Russ Heimerich. She will be driven by a parole officer from the Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla to an undisclosed location in southern California to serve her parole.

Knoller will not be allowed to live with her husband, Robert Noel, who was also convicted in the case and was released earlier. That’s because “parolees are usually prohibited from associating with other convicted felons,” CNN reports here.

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