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‘Dazed and Confused’ Subjects File Lawsuit Against Filmmaker


— October 10, 2004

SANTA FE, N.M. – Three Texas men say they were not as “Dazed and Confused” in high school as filmmaker Richard Linklater made them out to be in his movie of the same name.

The men’s Santa Fe attorney, Bill Robbins III, filed a civil lawsuit against Universal Studios here on Thursday. The suit was prompted by the 2002 DVD release of the 1993 cult classic, which follows the drug and alcohol fueled hijinks of teenagers on the last day of high school in May 1976.

The plaintiffs – Bobby Wooderson, Andy Slater and Richard “Pink” Floyd – say their former high-school classmate Linklater used their names and likenesses to create characters with the same surnames when he wrote the screenplay.

The men, who still live in Huntsville, Texas, where they went to high school, claim in the suit that the negative characterizations in the film caused them to suffer “relentless harassment, embarrassment and ridicule.” . . .

[R]obbins, who specializes in entertainment law, said the lawsuit was filed in Santa Fe because it has a longer statute of limitations than other states for claims of defamation and false light.

Details here from the AP via the Dallas Star-Telegram.


SANTA FE, N.M. – Three Texas men say they were not as “Dazed and Confused” in high school as filmmaker Richard Linklater made them out to be in his movie of the same name.

The men’s Santa Fe attorney, Bill Robbins III, filed a civil lawsuit against Universal Studios here on Thursday. The suit was prompted by the 2002 DVD release of the 1993 cult classic, which follows the drug and alcohol fueled hijinks of teenagers on the last day of high school in May 1976.

The plaintiffs – Bobby Wooderson, Andy Slater and Richard “Pink” Floyd – say their former high-school classmate Linklater used their names and likenesses to create characters with the same surnames when he wrote the screenplay.

The men, who still live in Huntsville, Texas, where they went to high school, claim in the suit that the negative characterizations in the film caused them to suffer “relentless harassment, embarrassment and ridicule.” . . .

[R]obbins, who specializes in entertainment law, said the lawsuit was filed in Santa Fe because it has a longer statute of limitations than other states for claims of defamation and false light.

Details here from the AP via the Dallas Star-Telegram.

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