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Lawyers’ Fees Come Under Fire


— January 4, 2004

Opponents of the current system are attempting to rein in attorneys’ contingency fees in Florida and at least 13 other states. The critics contend that contingency fees lead to overpaid lawyers, who can get thousands of dollars per hour in some cases.

”Law is supposed to serve people, not lawyers,” says Nancy Udell, general counsel of Common Good, a Washington group that wants to limit contingency fees in cases that haven’t progressed far in the legal process. “The rules about reasonable fees based on time expended and risk undertaken have almost universally been disregarded.”

Trial lawyers counter that contingency fees — called contingent fees by the legal profession — are the ”poor man’s key to the courthouse.” Without the fees, most people wouldn’t have the assets to take on deep-pocket corporations, they say.

The Miami Herald has a long and interesting article on the issue here. (via How Appealing)


Opponents of the current system are attempting to rein in attorneys’ contingency fees in Florida and at least 13 other states. The critics contend that contingency fees lead to overpaid lawyers, who can get thousands of dollars per hour in some cases.

”Law is supposed to serve people, not lawyers,” says Nancy Udell, general counsel of Common Good, a Washington group that wants to limit contingency fees in cases that haven’t progressed far in the legal process. “The rules about reasonable fees based on time expended and risk undertaken have almost universally been disregarded.”

Trial lawyers counter that contingency fees — called contingent fees by the legal profession — are the ”poor man’s key to the courthouse.” Without the fees, most people wouldn’t have the assets to take on deep-pocket corporations, they say.

The Miami Herald has a long and interesting article on the issue here. (via How Appealing)

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