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If At First You Don’t Succeed . . . .


— February 26, 2007

“Sukhbir Bedi passed the written examination for admission to the District of Columbia bar in February 1999 after multiple unsuccessful attempts. According to the Committee’s findings, between July 1988 and July 1998, Bedi failed the D.C. bar examination twelve times and failed the Virginia bar examination six times.”

Despite finally passing, the Committee on Admissions still wouldn’t admit him to the bar. Bedi asked why.

In response, the Committee set forth the following charges: (1) that Bedi cheated or attempted to cheat on the bar examinations administered in 1990, 1992 and 1996; (2) that he knowingly made “false statements to the Committee and/or its representatives in connection with his behavior during the February 1996 bar examination”; and (3) that between December 1991 and 1996, Bedi knowingly and falsely claimed on his applications for bar admission that he suffered from dyslexia for which he required special testing accommodations.

Doh! Here’s the opinion from District of Columbia Court of Appeals: In re Sukhbir Singh Bedi, Petitioner, No. 02-BG-977 (Feb. 22, 2007). Details from the Legal Profession Blog. (via Overlawyered)


“Sukhbir Bedi passed the written examination for admission to the District of Columbia bar in February 1999 after multiple unsuccessful attempts. According to the Committee’s findings, between July 1988 and July 1998, Bedi failed the D.C. bar examination twelve times and failed the Virginia bar examination six times.”

Despite finally passing, the Committee on Admissions still wouldn’t admit him to the bar. Bedi asked why.

In response, the Committee set forth the following charges: (1) that Bedi cheated or attempted to cheat on the bar examinations administered in 1990, 1992 and 1996; (2) that he knowingly made “false statements to the Committee and/or its representatives in connection with his behavior during the February 1996 bar examination”; and (3) that between December 1991 and 1996, Bedi knowingly and falsely claimed on his applications for bar admission that he suffered from dyslexia for which he required special testing accommodations.

Doh! Here’s the opinion from District of Columbia Court of Appeals: In re Sukhbir Singh Bedi, Petitioner, No. 02-BG-977 (Feb. 22, 2007). Details from the Legal Profession Blog. (via Overlawyered)

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