LegalReader.com  ·  Legal News, Analysis, & Commentary

News & Politics

Lawsuit Over YouTube Video: It’s What Everyone’s Watching


— March 22, 2007

You Tube Logo

A look at what’s at stake in Viacom Inc.’s $1 billion copyright infringement suit against Google.

SHERMAN OAKS, CALIF. – At an Internet cafe here, Barry Delatto toggles his computer screen from stock prices to e-mail and finds a URL for YouTube, the free website where users can post and watch video clips.

“It’s [an e-mail] from my girlfriend,” he says, clicking on a clip from the “Colbert Report,” a mock-news TV show on Comedy Central. “I better watch this before the courts shut YouTube down. Either that, or make them pay so much nobody will do this anymore.”

It’s a scene repeated so often – 160,000 free video clips viewed at least 1.5 billion times – that Comedy Central’s parent company, Viacom Inc., is asking the courts to make YouTube stop unauthorized postings of copyrighted video. . . .

[V]iacom’s lawsuit, filed March 13 in a US District Court in New York, seeks $1 billion in damages and asks the court to make YouTube, acquired by Google last year, halt the practice.

Details here from Daniel B. Wood of the Christian Science Monitor.


You Tube Logo

A look at what’s at stake in Viacom Inc.’s $1 billion copyright infringement suit against Google.

SHERMAN OAKS, CALIF. – At an Internet cafe here, Barry Delatto toggles his computer screen from stock prices to e-mail and finds a URL for YouTube, the free website where users can post and watch video clips.

“It’s [an e-mail] from my girlfriend,” he says, clicking on a clip from the “Colbert Report,” a mock-news TV show on Comedy Central. “I better watch this before the courts shut YouTube down. Either that, or make them pay so much nobody will do this anymore.”

It’s a scene repeated so often – 160,000 free video clips viewed at least 1.5 billion times – that Comedy Central’s parent company, Viacom Inc., is asking the courts to make YouTube stop unauthorized postings of copyrighted video. . . .

[V]iacom’s lawsuit, filed March 13 in a US District Court in New York, seeks $1 billion in damages and asks the court to make YouTube, acquired by Google last year, halt the practice.

Details here from Daniel B. Wood of the Christian Science Monitor.

Join the conversation!