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Wheelchairs of Fortune


— August 2, 2007

Attorney Tom Frankovich and his disabled clients sue small businesses to make them accessible – and make millions

Inside his elegant law office in a restored century-old Victorian at the upper end of Van Ness [in San Francisco], with his feet sprawled across an enormous hand-carved desk to reveal the most audacious pair of alligator boots this side of Wyoming, Tom Frankovich projects the swagger of a man at the top of his game.

The cartoon image that greets visitors to his law office Web site may well be the closest thing to a Frankovich self-portrait. In it, the burly, pony-tailed lawyer with a penchant for cowboy hats and bolo ties leads a throng of the disabled from atop a military tank labeled “Access Blaster.” A gun-toting female stands guard as Frankovich commandeers a special phone for the hard-of-hearing.

Perhaps not surprisingly, he professes to practice disabilities law the way his favorite role models, World War II generals Rommel and Patton, executed warfare. “The best defense is a good offense,” he declares. “You keep going. You don’t stop. The only thing that works is firepower; the more the better.”

Details here from the SF Weekly.


Attorney Tom Frankovich and his disabled clients sue small businesses to make them accessible – and make millions

Inside his elegant law office in a restored century-old Victorian at the upper end of Van Ness [in San Francisco], with his feet sprawled across an enormous hand-carved desk to reveal the most audacious pair of alligator boots this side of Wyoming, Tom Frankovich projects the swagger of a man at the top of his game.

The cartoon image that greets visitors to his law office Web site may well be the closest thing to a Frankovich self-portrait. In it, the burly, pony-tailed lawyer with a penchant for cowboy hats and bolo ties leads a throng of the disabled from atop a military tank labeled “Access Blaster.” A gun-toting female stands guard as Frankovich commandeers a special phone for the hard-of-hearing.

Perhaps not surprisingly, he professes to practice disabilities law the way his favorite role models, World War II generals Rommel and Patton, executed warfare. “The best defense is a good offense,” he declares. “You keep going. You don’t stop. The only thing that works is firepower; the more the better.”

Details here from the SF Weekly.

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