Pagefucker Update

They’re not just from Florida anymore:

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — A judge on Wednesday ordered the state Senate to suspend an investigation into accusations that one of its members fondled an 18-year-old legislative page.

The order, sought by Sen. Dan Sutton‘s lawyers and signed by state Circuit Judge David Gienapp, said the Senate must stop disciplinary proceedings against the Democrat until a court hearing Jan. 19 in Sutton’s hometown of Flandreau.

At that time, lawyers will present arguments on whether the Senate has the legal authority to investigate or discipline Sutton.

Sutton is accused of fondling a male high school student during last year’s session. Sutton has not talked publicly about the allegations, but his lawyers have said he did nothing wrong.

Details here from the AP via the New York Times.


Anshe Chung: First Virtual Millionaire

Anshe Chung, a real-estate tycoon in the digitally simulated world known as Second Life, has apparently become the first virtual millionaire–i.e., someone whose holdings in a make-believe world are legally convertible into genuine U.S. currency worth more than $1 million.

Chung is the nom de keyboard of Ailin Graef, a former schoolteacher who says she was born and raised in Hubei, China, and is now a citizen of Germany. She will give a press conference about her achievement tomorrow (November 28) at 9:00 a.m. PST, although it will occur in-world, i.e., to attend you will need to have downloaded Second Life’s software from the company that created and maintains it, Linden Lab.

Details here from CNNMoney.com‘s Legal Pad.


“Shedding the Unreality”

Duped by Neocons

This entry’s title is from The Washington Post, quoting “a senior official involved in policy since the 2003 invasion [of Iraq].”

Let me give you the full quotation:

“We are in a process of absorbing the factors of the situation we’re in and shedding the unreality that dominated at the beginning.”

My translation: The neocons who dominate the Bush Administration are finally having to wake up and smell the coffee. They thought there would be no resistance and few casualties, that the Iraqi people would welcome our soldiers with flowers, that the war would be over in weeks, and that democracy and peace would spread throughout the Middle East like a virus. Turns out, they were wrong.

Sane people – and all the lessons of history – told them they were impossibly wrong from day one. They wouldn’t listen. They huffed and puffed and bragged and denied for more than three years, while over 1,800 Americans died, countless others were maimed and wounded, and hundreds of thousands of Iraqis were killed.

Now, while things continue to worsen, Bush takes a five-week vacation, while “a senior official involved in policy since the 2003 invasion” says: “We are in a process of absorbing the factors of the situation we’re in and shedding the unreality1 that dominated at the beginning.”

Second translation: “We were full of shit from day one. We’ve pretended we weren’t for three years, but now the jig is up. We are desperate and trying to figure out how the fuck to save face. Help!”

Maureen Dowd sums it up nicely in a New York Times op-ed column here. Sleep tight.

1 Wishful thinking, but does “shedding the unreality” include hanging Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld by thier ankles from lamp posts? It should.


Sports Make IP Play

The professional sports industry has become entangled in an emerging web of intellectual property litigation over issues ranging from who owns player statistics in fantasy leagues to who possesses the view of a baseball park.

Legal experts say technology-specifically the Internet-is revolutionizing the way fans view and participate in sports while simultaneously creating a host of new legal headaches for the sports industry. In the last two years alone, more than a dozen copyright infringement and other IP-related suits have popped up in the sports world.

And the sports industry, attorneys note, is struggling to keep pace with technology, claiming that numerous copyright violations are occurring through new media they can’t control.

The leagues have complained about Fantasy sports websites using player statistics; “real time” webcasting of games; and even TiVo. And get this:

“Player statistics are in the public domain. We’ve never disputed that,” [Jim] Gallagher[, senior vice president, corporate communications for MLB Advance Media,] said. “But if you’re going to use statistics in a game for profit, you need a license from us to do that. We own those statistics when they’re used for commercial gain.”

Actually, no, Jim. It’s either in the public domain (for all purposes), or it ain’t. Details here from The National Law Journal.



In the Streets, a Shadow Lifts

Some thoughtful words from John F. Burns of The New York Times in Baghdad:

As Iraqis struggled to grasp the impact of Saddam Hussein’s humiliating capture in a darkened spider hole near Tikrit, it was the television images of the fallen leader that kept replaying in their minds throughout the day on Sunday, just like the images played on their television screens.

The videotape taken by his American captors showed a disheveled old man, more like a hapless, disoriented vagrant than the tyrant whose quarter of a century in power bludgeoned 25 million people into cringing submission. A mythic strongman, so feared that his name set people trembling until only a few months ago, was suddenly reduced to pitiable, mumbling impotence.

On the streets of Baghdad, and across Iraq, people who danced out of their homes with paper American flags and raised their rifles for staccato bursts into the clear winter air paused to tell one another again and again what they had seen. They acted as if ceaseless repetition would make real what many called a dream, as if testing their sanity by checking that others had also experienced what they had seen.

Long into the night, the images replayed on televisions at kebab houses and grocery stores, in homes and hospitals. They showed the captured dictator opening his mouth obediently to an American doctor’s beam, sitting passively as his unkempt hair was searched for lice, patting his face as if to identify an aching jaw or troublesome teeth, pulling on his straggly beard as if pondering his fate.

As the mocking shouts grew louder in a thousand Baghdad streets, and across almost all Iraqi towns outside the sullen precincts like Tikrit that are still loyal to Mr. Hussein, it was possible to believe that Iraq’s nightmare had finally ended.

That is what President Bush proclaimed. The hope, as fervent among millions of Iraqis, was that the shadow Mr. Hussein cast for a generation over the Iraqi soul had passed, never to return.

Yet Americans may be wise to restrain hopes that Mr. Hussein’s capture will generate an early downturn in the insurgency that has taken the lives of more than 190 American soldiers since May 1, the day Mr. Bush proclaimed an end to major combat operations. At the same time, many more Iraqis have died.

And listening to the voices in Baghdad’s streets on Sunday suggested that the end of Mr. Hussein’s months as a taunting fugitive may not contain the other forces that have eroded American popularity. Mr. Hussein’s capture brought a surge in popularity for Mr. Bush and the American occupation, yet the inflexions in what the revelers said often sounded like a warning that the tide could just as easily break on the stony shores of unfulfilled Iraqi expectations.

The scenes that played out across much of Iraq were replicated in the celebrations that greeted the American capture of Baghdad, and the toppling of Mr. Hussein, eight months ago.

This time, American troops have done more than help topple a statue, having caught the man himself.

But few who witnessed the statue falling could have imagined the speed with which Iraqi opinions began to turn against the Americans as problems accumulated with failing electricity supplies, looting and lawlessness on the streets and lines outside gasoline stations that have stretched into days. Judging from the undertones in what many people said on Sunday, there was little reason to think that something similar could not happen again.

Read the rest of Mr. Burns’ long piece here.


Trademark Lawsuit Over “Cheeseburger, Cheeseburger!”

Billy Goat, the tavern beneath [Chicago’s] Michigan Avenue made famous by the “cheezborger, cheezborger” skits on “Saturday Night Live” in the late 1970s, sued Cheeburger Cheeburger Restaurants Inc. on Monday for trademark infringement.

The federal lawsuit comes as Cheeburger Cheeburger, a Florida-based chain of 32 family-style restaurants mostly in the South and East, plans to open its first location in suburban Chicago. . . .

[T]he famous phrase comes from [owner Sam] Sianis and Greek immigrant co-workers barking out the orders of customers during busy lunch hours [at the Billy Goat].

It became immortalized when comedian John Belushi, in a series of skits on “Saturday Night Live,” would tell customers hoping to order something else: “Cheezborger, cheezborger, cheezborger � no Pepsi–Coke. No fries–cheeps.”

Citing a Tribune story, the lawsuit said Don Novello, better known as “Father Guido Sarducci,” another long-running “Saturday Night Live” character, wrote the “cheezborger, cheezborger” skit based on Billy Goat’s.

In a Tribune story commemorating Billy Goat’s 50th anniversary in 1984, Novello said he had regularly visited the Lower Michigan Avenue tavern in the late 1960s when he worked in Chicago as an advertising copywriter.

And now, this. Didn’t that phrase enter the public domain back in 1976 (now 27 years ago) when Saturday Night Live put it on the map? Details here from the BillingsGazette.com. (via FARK)


TiVo and NPR

This has absolutely nothing to do with the topic of this blog, but: NPR’s Senior Technology Correspondent John McChesney came to my house last night and interviewed me. Not about blogs (or even blawgs), but about my TiVo. He happened to overhear me talking about TiVo while relaxing after work in a Public House a couple of weeks ago. He also happened to be considering doing a story about TiVo at the time. Voila! It was fun, and kind of cool. I’ll post a link to the audio if it ever makes the air. (BTW: TiVo rules!)


‘Horse’s Ass’ Initiative Out Of Starting Gate

A judge has given tentative approval for a voter initiative to have Tim Eyman — the local king of voter initiatives — officially labeled a “horse’s ass.” David Goldstein, the initiative’s author, “wants to call attention to what he sees as abuse of the initiative process by Eyman and others,” according to this. UPDATE (3/10/02): David Goldstein has a website devoted to his “horse’s ass” initiative.


Iraqi Lawmakers Back Bill on U.S. Withdrawal

By Joshua Partlow
Washington Post Foreign Service
Friday, May 11, 2007; Page A12

BAGHDAD, May 10 — A majority of members of Iraq’s parliament have signed a draft bill that would require a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. soldiers from Iraq and freeze current troop levels. The development was a sign of a growing division between Iraq’s legislators and prime minister that mirrors the widening gulf between the Bush administration and its critics in Congress.

The draft bill proposes a timeline for a gradual departure, much like what some U.S. Democratic lawmakers have demanded, and would require the Iraqi government to secure parliament’s approval before any further extensions of the U.N. mandate for foreign troops in Iraq, which expires at the end of 2007.

The neocons who put us in Iraq in the first place have been disgraced. Our own congress wants us out. Our own people want us out. And now the Iraqi “government” wants us out, too. What is it going to take to get George Bush to admit that the main thrust of his presidency has completely failed and that we need to get the hell out of Iraq, now? Will it take another Kent State?

The text in the box above is quoted from Joshua Partlow of the Washington Post.